2009 NCAA football coaches contracts
Use the navigation below to see football head coach and assistant coach salaries.

Sources: USA TODAY research by Steve Berkowitz, Tony DeBarros, A.J. Perez and Jodi Upton.
Credit: By Sean Dougherty, David Evans, Alex Newman and Chad Palmer, USA TODAY.

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Analyzing salaries for Football Bowl Subdivision coaches
Updated 21h 36m ago |  Comments 93  |  Recommend 29 E-mail | Save | Print | Subscribe to stories like this
Methodology

To determine the total pay packages of Football Bowl Subdivision (formerly known as Division I-A) coaches for their current contract years, USA TODAY requested all forms of compensation for the head football coach at all 120 schools. USA TODAY obtained at least some information on all but nine schools, most of which are private. Four public schools did not provide contracts; 17 did not provide the NCAA-mandated outside income report, which covers athletically related income the coach receives from non-university sources (e.g. support organization, apparel contracts). Schools that provided contract information were given the opportunity to review their figures. A not available (NA) in the chart denotes schools that are private or did not release the information or schools whose coaches are new and had not filed an outside income report. A $0 means either the coach doesn't get compensation from that activity/source or it's contained in another category and the documentation did not break it down.

Explanations of compensation catgories

Salary: Base salary, deferred payments earned on an annual basis, annuity payments for current contract year, payments based on ticket revenue when available, contractual expense accounts, housing allowances, etc. Salaries reported do not take into account deductions that have, or may, occur because of state government furlough actions.

Other income: Income for most recently available year from contract provisions other than those related to salary or from other agreements (e.g. shoe and/or apparel contracts; consideration for appearing on TV, radio or other media shows; making speeches or other public appearances; camps). Universities generally guarantee most — but not all — of this income; some might come from outside sources.

Total salary: Combination of salary and other income. Value of perks such as game tickets, luxury suites, cars, family travel, country club memberships and standard university benefits such as health care are not included.

Maximum bonus: The greatest amount that can be received if team meets prescribed on-field performance goals (e.g., win totals, bowl game appearances, conference and/or national championships, coach of the year awards, etc.), academic and/or player-conduct goals.

Footnotes

•Connecticut: Edsall receives additional compensation under a shoe-apparel contract and from his annual camp. The university declined to release information about either.

•Florida: Contract not yet released. Salary based on school-announced average of $4 million a year. The university declined to release outside income information.

•Michigan State: Maximum bonus represents the amount of the pool for Dantonio and his assistant coaches from which Dantonio is guaranteed $175,000, plus a share determined at the discretion of him and the athletics director.

•North Carolina: Davis receives additional compensation under media and shoe-apparel contracts the university declined to release. The deals paid him $499,000 in 2007 and were scheduled to pay $505,000 in 2008, the university said in 2007. The university declined to release the amount this year.

•Oregon: Includes supplemental payment based on ticket sales and team television appearances that is guaranteed at $250,000 but could be higher.

•Purdue: Hope is guaranteed this amount for the 2009 season because his bonus earnings, when added to a base salary of $220,000, will not exceed the guaranteed amount. In the future, if his base salary and bonuses exceed the guaranteed amount, he will receive only the base salary and the bonuses.

•Temple: Information is from a report for fiscal 2008 required by Pennsylvania's Right-to-Know Law.

•Texas Christian: Current-year compensation total; information provided by the athletics department.

•Texas Tech: Salary includes an $800,000 bonus that will be due if Leach remains the school's head coach as of Dec. 31.

Posted 1d 10h ago
Updated 21h 36m ago
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Comments: (93)
Showing:     New: Most recommended!

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flynlow (0 friends, send message) wrote: 5m ago
midpac78 (8 friends, send message) wrote: 13h 14m ago
jameszz (1 friends, send message) wrote: 7m ago
jameszz (1 friends, send message) wrote: 13m ago
And just think.........Coaches make this kind of money but if a college player accepts five dollars for raking leaves they get suspended and put on probation. Colleges make millions off their sports programs but athletes are held to a strict set of rules. Of course the main goal should be the education they receive but share the wealth

................................

That is false. College athletes are free to hold jobs and earn money. They just cannot be paid for their endorsements.

You should do your research before you stick you foot in your mouth jameszz.

------------------------------------------------ --------------------------
greenbox, you should get a life instead of insulting people on a comment page. Are you really going to defend the way Colleges and the NCAA exploit players in exchange for the millions they rake in. I wrote it that way to make a point. I guess you missed it.

____________________________________________

A free education, a chance to play the sport they love, and a defacto tryout for million dollar jobs in the NFL. Yeah, they really do stick it to these kids!
FYI, most college athletic departments do not have a budget in the black.

As a scholarship athlete playing football I am not allowed to have a paying job during the school year due to the old practice of Wealthy Alumni giving me a job in their company while paying me a huge salary for doing no work.

This was a common practice before the NCAA changed the rules a long time age.

Instead I can have a summer job for said Alumni and get paid in cash a ton of money for doing nothing which makes up for not having a job doing the school year. I get paid to play football.

I do believe that if you are not on scholarship or are in a club type sport than yes you can have a job, but I am not 100% sure on that.

The NCAA is very strict on what you can receive as compensation. For instance, I can not sell my tickets to football games to make a little extra cash- no even for face value. If I do not use my tickets then the School sells them and collects the money.


User Image
Bob Dickerson (3 friends, send message) wrote: 6h 50m ago
They deserve it - Obama says the taxes will filter down to the lowly ones. Robin Hood lives!

User Image
woofn (6 friends, send message) wrote: 7h 40m ago
the weis $ is wrong i assure you...

User Image
midpac78 (8 friends, send message) wrote: 13h 44m ago
jameszz (1 friends, send message) wrote: 7m ago
jameszz (1 friends, send message) wrote: 13m ago
And just think.........Coaches make this kind of money but if a college player accepts five dollars for raking leaves they get suspended and put on probation. Colleges make millions off their sports programs but athletes are held to a strict set of rules. Of course the main goal should be the education they receive but share the wealth

................................

That is false. College athletes are free to hold jobs and earn money. They just cannot be paid for their endorsements.

You should do your research before you stick you foot in your mouth jameszz.

------------------------------------------------ --------------------------
greenbox, you should get a life instead of insulting people on a comment page. Are you really going to defend the way Colleges and the NCAA exploit players in exchange for the millions they rake in. I wrote it that way to make a point. I guess you missed it.

____________________________________________

A free education, a chance to play the sport they love, and a defacto tryout for million dollar jobs in the NFL. Yeah, they really do stick it to these kids!
FYI, most college athletic departments do not have a budget in the black.

User Image
jameszz (1 friends, send message) wrote: 14h ago
jameszz (1 friends, send message) wrote: 13m ago
And just think.........Coaches make this kind of money but if a college player accepts five dollars for raking leaves they get suspended and put on probation. Colleges make millions off their sports programs but athletes are held to a strict set of rules. Of course the main goal should be the education they receive but share the wealth

................................

That is false. College athletes are free to hold jobs and earn money. They just cannot be paid for their endorsements.

You should do your research before you stick you foot in your mouth jameszz.

------------------------------------------------ --------------------------
greenbox, you should get a life instead of insulting people on a comment page. Are you really going to defend the way Colleges and the NCAA exploit players in exchange for the millions they rake in. I wrote it that way to make a point. I guess you missed it.

User Image
zippy68 (15 friends, send message) wrote: 14h 4m ago
Rich Rodriguez is the most overpaid for performance ratio. Last year he was 3-8. This year he's won one Big Ten game. Michigan is under NCAA scrtinty for practice violations. He lied to the Detroit Free Press saying his players set academic records, but when the FP contacted Michigan offices, they said no such records are even kept. His business partner in SC is under indictment for fraud.

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greenbox (0 friends, send message) wrote: 14h 10m ago
ECU's Skip Holtz = $1.3 million? You have to be kidding me, right? All that for 5-4.

If this is ECU's idea of making smart decisions, then I'll definitely not send my kids to school there.

Oh my goodness.

User Image
greenbox (0 friends, send message) wrote: 14h 15m ago
jameszz (1 friends, send message) wrote: 13m ago
And just think.........Coaches make this kind of money but if a college player accepts five dollars for raking leaves they get suspended and put on probation. Colleges make millions off their sports programs but athletes are held to a strict set of rules. Of course the main goal should be the education they receive but share the wealth

................................

That is false. College athletes are free to hold jobs and earn money. They just cannot be paid for their endorsements.

You should do your research before you stick you foot in your mouth jameszz.

User Image
LeRoue (0 friends, send message) wrote: 14h 25m ago
You've got to expect this kind of money for coaches who must tell players, who stand slack jawed on the field and mutter "Da, what now coach?". Since football is a chess game for the coaches, anything less than eight wins a season should result inimmediate termination. Solution, bring back the single wing and 6-2-2-1, require athletes to represent their schools in more than one sport and eliminate coaching and diaper changing on the sidelines. And that's not all...

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